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Online Master of Science in Criminology Curriculum

Tailor Your Criminology Coursework

Our online or on campus Master of Science in Criminology degree provides three focus areas that students can pursue for deeper emphasis in particular fields of interest. Use your previous knowledge and experience as a foundation for this advanced analysis of criminal behavior and specialize in a specific career track from three distinct areas of focus:

  • Leadership – Study conflict resolution, governance, and organization for leadership roles.
  • Human Behavior – Examine the circumstances and psychology that drive criminal behaviors.
  • Cybercrime / Terrorism – Learn to predict and prevent technology crimes, and acts of terrorism.

Both the online and on campus Master of Science in Criminology program offer a customizable curriculum. Regardless of the course, you will have the opportunity to work with your professor to tailor assignments within the context of each course to your interests and career aspirations.

Learning Outcomes of the M.S. in Criminology include:

  • Demonstrate enhanced speaking, writing, and leadership abilities essential for success in your chosen career.
  • Construct, critically analyze, challenge, and defend concepts critical for comprehending the discipline of Criminology.
  • Recognize the cultural and individual diversities of the human condition.
  • Describe and understand the multiplicities of aberrant human behaviors.
  • Articulate personal responsibilities for promoting the common good.

The Master of Science in Criminology degree requires the successful completion of 36 credit hours of graduate-level courses. Classes are offered online, at a variety of Regis University campus locations, or a combination of both.

Degree Requirements (36 credit hours)

MSCR 604 Contemporary Issues in Criminology (3 credit hours) Examines the scope of criminology based on global research and practical applications. The scope includes public safety, terrorism and organized crime, urban crime, victimology, restorative justice, crime prevention and other existing and emerging issues.

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MSCR 605 Criminal Psychopathology (3 credit hours) Examines the criminal mind. Explores criminal behavior patterns, factors that influence criminal behavior, and the pathology of criminal behavior. Considers changing environments, demographics, and events.

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MSCR 620 Leadership Principles in Criminology (3 credit hours) Examines contemporary leadership theories and models and explores multiple examples and case studies within Criminology. Specific areas of discipline, system collaboration, teamwork, stakeholder perceptions, and leadership ethics will be discussed.

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MSCR 625 Ethical Conduct and Positions of Power (3 credit hours) Examines contemporary ethical standards and conduct in multiple contexts. Case studies, readings and discussion examine conflicts of interest, authoritative power and abuse, political influence, trust relationships and violation of trust, and other dilemmas faced by individuals in positions of leadership.

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MSCR 640 Transnational Crime (3 credit hours) Surveys and evaluates dominant trends in crime, i.e. organized crime, economic crime, cybercrime, terrorism, traffic in human beings, and drug dealing, from an economic and social-cultural context of globalization. Topics such as population migratory trends, transnational cooperation, and supranational policies will be discussed.

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MSCR 650 Contemporary Crime Policy: Current and Future Need (3 credit hours) Current and Future Needs: Analyzes existing policies and explores policy change and development incorporating emerging crime trends, cultural diversity, resources and other influential factors.

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MSCR 652 Strategic Planning, Implementation and Evaluation (3 credit hours) Utilizes research methods to identify criteria for effective policy making and evaluation. Examines factors which impact successful policy development, implementation, and evaluation.

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MSCR 654 Crime Prediction and Prevention (3 credit hours) Analyzes crime prediction and prevention techniques. Addresses reducing the risk of crime in private and public sectors. Identifies safety for families, employees, and customers and the means by which business private and public property are protected.

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MSCR 657 Animal Exploitation (3 credit hours) Cutting-edge multidisciplinary course designed to acquaint students with contemporary and historical animal-ethics/rights issues, to think critically about controversial issues regarding the relationships between humans and other animals. Examines a wide variety of topics related to the law of animals, such as classes of animals (companion, exotic, domestic), torts (liability statues, damages and valuation), criminal law (breeding regulations, legal vs. illegal breeding, animal cruelty), hoarding, entertainment regulations, dog fighting, the Human Slaughter Act, the Animal Welfare Act and the Endangered Species Act.

MSCR 660 Cyber Criminology (3 credit hours) Examines crimes committed using computer technology. Discusses strategies, tactics, and collaboration involved in combating cybercrime and cyber-criminals. Discusses future trends in digital crime and criminological theories.

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MSCR 670 Computer Forensics (3 credit hours) This course introduces the knowledge of the law and techniques necessary to the work of a computer forensics analyst. Many people do not know that the scientific discipline of computer forensics is gaining prominence, and rapidly becoming essential to recovering evidence that is so vital to pursuing justice for all persons. New cutting-edge content on cyberterrorism, social engineering, network forensics and the process of retrieving and analyzing digital evidence will be presented. This course will prepare the student who seeks to obtain knowledge and skills about the legality of searches and evidence seizure, storage, transport and analysis of electronically stored information. The technical and legal rules of procedure involved in searching, extracting, maintaining and storing electronic information will be covered. This course is designed to fill the need for a comprehensive background in the law and techniques in computer forensics, without being too technical, or too thick in legal analysis. This course is suitable for the student who does not have a technical or legal background in computer forensics.

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MSCR 680 Rapid Decision Making (3 credit hours) Studies decision models which enable timely decision-making in time of crisis and limited knowledge. Case studies are used to refine organization of knowledge, critical thinking and communication of decisions.

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MSCR 694 Research Analysis and Application (3 credit hours) Provides an overview of social science research methods employed by criminologists, emphasizing diagnostic and analytical tools, research design and evaluation methods and innovative thinking. Prerequisite(s): Must successfully complete all MSCR courses, with the exception of MSCR 696 Capstone Project.

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MSCR 696 Capstone Project (3 credit hours) Directed research that provides experience of the student's major interests and academic work; focusing on an integration and application of appropriate theory and data that addresses a criminology topic of interest to the student. Prerequisite(s): Must successfully complete all MSCR courses prior to taking MSCR 696. NOTE: Pass/No Pass grading only.

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Optional Focus Area Requirements
The Master in Criminology degree requires 36 credit hours regardless of whether or not a 9 credit hour focus area is pursued. If you choose to complete a focus area, the focus area requirements will replace three graduate courses approved by your academic advisor.

Leadership Focus Area>>

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Human Behavior Focus Area>>

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Cybercrime/Terrorism Focus Area>>

NOTE: Course MSCR 660 is a prerequisite that must be completed prior to starting the focus area.

MSCR 670: Computer Forensics, Law, Evidence and Cyberterrorism Explores the law, methodology and techniques used by computer forensics analysts while differentiating between cyber terrorism and cybercrime. This course does not require a strong technical or legal background.

MSIA 670 Enterprise Information Assurance (3 credit hours) Introduces the basic Information Assurance (IA) model; security of the database, the application and the system. Examines current security standards, best practices and auditing practices.

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MSIA 678 Risk Management (3 credit hours) Prepares students to evaluate an organizations exposure to information technology security threats using rigorous policy and standards based analysis of the existing policy directives and the derived threat matrix.

To learn more about the online and on-campus curriculum of Regis University's Master of Science in Criminology program, call 877-820-0581. You may also request information or visit our resource center to gain more insight on the criminology and criminal justice industry.

 

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